Skip to main content

Table 6 Future wage effects of a long-term non-employment spell for men and women. Dependent variable: log real hourly wage, j waves after the interruption

From: Back to work: the effect of a long-term career interruption on subsequent wages in Switzerland

Waves after interruption (= j): 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Men − 0.105a (0.019) − 0.118a (0.019) − 0.095a (0.020) − 0.102a (0.019) − 0.095a (0.017) −0.042b (0.019) −0.023 (0.019) 0.004 (0.022)
Observations with long-term career interruption indicated j waves ago 113 99 88 89 110 74 70 56
Total observations 15,936 13,709 11,768 10,229 9152 7731 6552 5513
Women − 0.058a (0.018) − 0.065a (0.018) − 0.081a (0.017) − 0.032c (0.017) 0.017 (0.016) 0.012 (0.017) 0.011(0.019) − 0.000 (0.020)
Observations with long-term career interruption indicated j waves ago 225 216 199 188 214 172 160 119
Total observations 16,012 13,652 11,608 9954 8741 7266 6034 4963
  1. Source: Swiss Household Panel (SHP), own calculations
  2. The separate samples for men and women in column j are equally restricted to individuals who reported to be employed in j interview waves since the interruption ended, where j equals 1, 2, …, 8, respectively. As we still find a significant negative effect for men after 6 interview waves, we extended our analysis by two more periods to show that the wage recovers later in the future. Full set of control variables is: age, age2, children, sector, firm size, type of job, dummies for married, part-time, fixed-term contract, lag j final period of education, lag j further education and wave. Standard errors are in parentheses. a significant at the 1% level, b significant at the 5% level, c significant at the 10% level